The Sheller Law Firm P.L.L.C.

Personal Injury - Life Insurance Sales Fraud - DWI Defense - Class Action - Legal Malpractice

Personal Injury

 
 

Board Certified in Personal Injury Trial Law

The Texas Board of Legal Specialization, which is a State of Texas Organization, certifies lawyers to be Board Certified in Personal Injury Trial Law (and other specialties). There are only 1800 lawyers out of over 100,000 in the entire state that are Board Certified in Personal Injury Trial Law.  In order to obtain the certification you have to have tried 10 jury trials as lead counsel, pass a written 1 day test, and obtain the recommendation of 5 Judges and other lawyers.

Negligence is defined in Texas law (and most other states) as the failure to do what a reasonable person would have done under the same or similar circumstances, or doing what a reasonable person would not have done under the same or similar circumstances (such as hitting the accelerator instead of the brake).  You have to have a legal duty to the other person such as to drive safely and not hit them. The person is entitled to damages caused by your breach of the duty to drive safely, and not hit them.

Comparative Fault

Texas is a comparative fault state. If you are found 51% Negligent in Texas (and 32 other States) you get zero.

Click here to see the types of personal injury cases handled by The Sheller Law Firm.

OK, Let’s Go

If you think you might benefit from legal counsel, now is the time to contact The Sheller Law Firm. And remember, don't sign anything at all until you get our legal advice. The information presented in this website should not be construed to be either formal legal advice nor the formation of an attorney/client relationship. It is the policy of The Sheller Law Firm that all clients of the firm must sign an engagement agreement stating the terms of the firm’s engagement to provide legal services. In the absence of an agreement signed by you and a representative of the firm, and the payment of any required retainer (if applicable), you should not expect that the firm is representing you, nor undertaking any obligation to act or refrain from acting on your behalf.